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Mississippi

The State of Funding Equity in Mississippi

In this analysis, we examine how revenues of districts serving the most students from low-income backgrounds, students of color, or English learners compare with those of their counterparts in each state. 

Our analyses compare the average state and local revenues of districts grouped into quartiles based on student demographic characteristics. The analysis does not include federal revenues, which are intended to support supplemental services to specific groups of students such as students in poverty, English learners, and students with disabilities. The only federal dollars included in our analysis are those that are specifically meant to replace state and local funds: Impact Aid. 

The analysis also does not include independently operated charter schools or districts that only operate charter schools.

For more information, please see the Equal Is Not Good Enough brief and the technical appendix.

How Is State and Local Revenue Distributed?

States’ funding systems should ensure that districts receive significant additional state and local funding to support students from low-income families and English learners. In addition, state funding systems should ensure that districts serving high concentrations of students of color receive at least as much state and local funding as other districts. Unfortunately, that is not what we see in the data. Instead, we see a varied picture in which too many districts with more need — no matter how you define it – do not receive more state and local funding.

by Poverty Quartile

No Data Found

Reading this figure: The highest poverty districts receive $9,605.96 state and local revenue per student

0 %
more per student

The highest poverty districts receive $748 or 8.4% more state and local revenue per student than the lowest poverty districts.

by Students of Color Quartile

No Data Found

Reading this figure: The districts with the most students of color receive $9,650.77 state and local revenue per student

0 %
more per student

The districts serving the most students of color receive $839 or 9.5% more state and local revenue per student than the districts serving the fewest students of color.

by English Learners Quartile

No Data Found

There is no data reported in Mississippi for students learning English.

0 %
more per student

The districts serving the most English learners receive $0 or 0% more state and local revenue per student than the districts serving the fewest English learners.

How Well Does the State Distribute State Funding to Counteract any Inequities in Local Funding?

Percent of District Funding That Comes From State (as Opposed to Local) Sources: 58%

Local revenue is mainly derived from local property taxes, which is inherently inequitable. Different communities have different property values, and districts in property-wealthy communities will always have an easier time raising more money at similar tax rates.

State funding formulas usually have mechanisms that counteract the inequities in local revenue that exist across districts. In some states, these policies are actually effective, so that total state and local revenue is progressive, even if local revenue is not. But many other states are not meeting this mark, and some have a long way to go.

by Poverty Quartile

No Data Found

Reading this figure: The highest poverty districts receive $5,545.77 state revenue per student and $4,060.19 local revenue per student

0 %
more per student

The highest poverty districts receive $605 or 12% more state revenue per student than the lowest poverty districts.

by Students of Color Quartile

No Data Found

Reading this figure: The districts with the most students of color receive $5,520.75 state revenue per student and $4,130.02 local revenue per student

0 %
more per student

The districts serving the most students of color receive $118 or 2.2% more state revenue per student than the districts serving the fewest students of color.

by English Learners Quartile

No Data Found

There is no data reported in Mississippi for students learning English.

0 %
more per student

The districts serving the most English learners receive $0 or 0% more state revenue per student than the districts serving the fewest English learners.

How Do State and Local Revenue Gaps Compare Across States?

Gaps in State and Local Revenues per Student
Between Districts Serving the Most and Fewest Students from Low-Income Backgrounds

No Data Found

Gaps in State and Local Revenues per Student
Between Districts Serving the Most and Fewest Students of Color

No Data Found

Gaps in State and Local Revenues per Student
Between Districts Serving the Most and Fewest English Learners

No Data Found

How Do State Revenue Gaps Compare Across States?

Gaps in State Revenues per Student
Between Districts Serving the Most and Fewest Students from Low-Income Backgrounds

No Data Found

Gaps in State Revenues per Student
Between Districts Serving the Most and Fewest Students of Color

No Data Found

Gaps in State Revenues per Student
Between Districts Serving the Most and Fewest English Learners

No Data Found

Who Attends Mississippi Schools?

0

Total Public Elementary and Secondary Enrollment, 2020

Student Enrollment by Race/Ethnicity, 2020

No Data Found

Percentage of Students by Student Group, 2020

No Data Found